ABOUT Matt Shipman

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Matt Shipman is a science writer and public information officer at North Carolina State University, where he writes about everything from forensic anthropology to computer malware. He previously worked as a reporter and editor in the Washington, D.C. area for Inside EPA, Water Policy Report and Risk Policy Report, covering the nexus of science, politics and policy.

In his free time, Shipman runs a non-profit organization called the First Step Project that has nothing to do with science, plays guitar badly (but with enthusiasm) and keeps track of the juvenile humans who live in his house. You can follow him on Twitter: @ShipLives.

Anyone interested in hiring Shipman for freelance writing or editing projects can reach him at shiplives[at]gmail.com.

 

Matt Shipman: All Posts

 
 

Science Borealis – Lighting up Canadian Scicomm

Posted 25 August 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Jenny Ryan, a communications manager at Canadian Science Publishing and a founding member of the team behind the Canadian digital science salon Science Borealis. Ryan writes here about the evolution of Science Borealis from concept to reality, lessons learned during that process, and what the project’s organizers hope to do next. What happens when a bunch of Canadian science bloggers team up? Well, in the case of Science Borealis they turn their... Read more

A General Overview of reddit’s Science Communities

Posted 12 August 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Victoria Taylor, director of communications for reddit. Taylor’s job is to work with “the media, talent, organizations and others that want to optimize their interactions with the reddit community.” For an introduction to reddit, see my beginner's guide to reddit. Are you someone in the STEM fields, or an enthusiast on scientific related topics? If so, you may be familiar with some of reddit’s science communities. Redditors love science and as such,... Read more

Institutional Blogging: Do You Really Want To Do This?

Posted 4 August 2014 by Matt Shipman

Someone where you work (maybe it’s you), says: “Maybe we should start a blog.” Why not? Lots of people have blogs, and some of them are really popular. So maybe your office should start a blog about all of the stuff going on at your university, research lab, department, or whatever. After all, you’re doing stuff that’s really cool and you want people to know about it. But then the questions start. How much would it cost? Who would write... Read more

One Way To Highlight Diversity in STEM Fields

Posted 29 July 2014 by Matt Shipman

The fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (known collectively as STEM) have a diversity problem. In 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau reported that women, African Americans and Hispanics are significantly under-represented in STEM fields. For example, in 2011, 11 percent of the U.S. workforce was African American, while 6 percent of STEM workers were African American. And while Hispanics made up 15 percent of the workforce, they made up only 7 percent of STEM workers. Women made up 48... Read more

Why a Bunch of Science Writers Are Writing About a Fictional Planet

Posted 22 July 2014 by Matt Shipman

Tatooine is a desert planet, home to Luke Skywalker and Jabba the Hutt, as well as a menagerie of large beasts: banthas and dewbacks, krayt dragons and sarlacci. Tatooine is also, of course, not a real place. Science writing aims to convey ideas, engaging and educating readers on topics from biology to astronomy. Because science writing is focused on real efforts to understand the real universe, you might reasonably ask why a collection of science writers have chosen to spend... Read more

Scicomm Accessibility: Accessing Scicomm Journals

Posted 8 July 2014 by Matt Shipman

Science communication researchers aren’t the only people interested in science communication research. Reporters, bloggers and researchers from various fields interested in sharing their work (among others) are interested in learning what “scicomm” can tell us about conveying scientific information to various audiences. But reaching the relevant research findings can be difficult. I doubt that most people expect scicomm research to give us a specific prescription for how to communicate effectively. Research doesn’t work that way, and most of us know... Read more

Ocean 180: Challenging Scientists to Explain their Research

Posted 1 July 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Mallory Watson, a scientist with the Florida Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence. Watson is also part of the Ocean 180 Video Challenge, which aims to help scientists improve their science communication skills by creating short videos that explain scientific research and its relevance. This post offers an overview of Ocean 180, how it came into being, and how marine scientists can participate. I suspect this may be of interest to folks... Read more

Social Media 101: Notes From My Talk At Sharing Science

Posted 27 June 2014 by Matt Shipman

I was recently invited to speak at a conference called Sharing Science: Writing and Communications Skills for the 21st Century. The June 27 conference was aimed at “science and health writers working for universities, non-profits and hospitals,” and was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with support from the National Association of Science Writers. Specifically, I was asked to speak, along with Lee Aase of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, on issues related to new media and social... Read more

How I Decide What To Blog About

Posted 23 June 2014 by Matt Shipman

I think about writing in different ways, depending on who I’m writing for. I’m a science writer and public information officer (PIO) at a large university. When I’m writing in my capacity as a PIO, I am writing for my employer; I’m pretty thoughtful in regard to both what I choose to write about and how I choose to write about it. Is it a story that people will be interested in? Is this research interesting or important to external... Read more

Scicomm Accessibility: A Call For Shared Language

Posted 17 June 2014 by Matt Shipman

High profile policy issues, such as those related to global climate change or antibiotic resistance, highlight the need for helping people understand scientific concepts and how they relate to “real world” problems. And there seems to be an increasing level of awareness among scientists, reporters and bloggers (among others) that science communication, as a discipline, can help us communicate more effectively with a wide array of audiences. But there’s a stumbling block – and it’s an ironic one: science communication... Read more