social media

 

Following Your Passion Project: Notes from the 2014 National Association of Science Writers Meeting

Posted 13 November 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post from Brooke Borel. Borel is a freelance science writer and author. She organized a session at the 2014 meeting of the National Association of Science Writers on what it takes to make a “passion project” a success, and I asked her to write a guest post on the subject. Last month, 430 science journalists and communicators took over a Marriott hotel in downtown Columbus, Ohio for their annual meeting, which included talks and... Read more

Study: Talking To Reporters Can Boost Scientific Impact (And So Can Twitter)

Posted 23 September 2014 by Matt Shipman

A recent paper in Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly highlights the role of public communications in boosting a researcher’s profile in the science community and finds that Twitter appears to increase the impact of those public communication efforts. This is only the latest article to link news coverage of research to scientific impact (I’ve written about related research here and here), but the new paper does a few things I haven’t seen before. First, it looks at a number of... Read more

Science Borealis – Lighting up Canadian Scicomm

Posted 25 August 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Jenny Ryan, a communications manager at Canadian Science Publishing and a founding member of the team behind the Canadian digital science salon Science Borealis. Ryan writes here about the evolution of Science Borealis from concept to reality, lessons learned during that process, and what the project’s organizers hope to do next. What happens when a bunch of Canadian science bloggers team up? Well, in the case of Science Borealis they turn their... Read more

A General Overview of reddit’s Science Communities

Posted 12 August 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Victoria Taylor, director of communications for reddit. Taylor’s job is to work with “the media, talent, organizations and others that want to optimize their interactions with the reddit community.” For an introduction to reddit, see my beginner's guide to reddit. Are you someone in the STEM fields, or an enthusiast on scientific related topics? If so, you may be familiar with some of reddit’s science communities. Redditors love science and as such,... Read more

Social Media 101: Notes From My Talk At Sharing Science

Posted 27 June 2014 by Matt Shipman

I was recently invited to speak at a conference called Sharing Science: Writing and Communications Skills for the 21st Century. The June 27 conference was aimed at “science and health writers working for universities, non-profits and hospitals,” and was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison with support from the National Association of Science Writers. Specifically, I was asked to speak, along with Lee Aase of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, on issues related to new media and social... Read more

A Beginner’s Guide to reddit

Posted 29 April 2014 by Matt Shipman

I’ve gotten quite a few questions recently about reddit, the electronic bulletin board – and self-proclaimed “front page of the internet” – where users share everything from scientific articles to pictures of cats. Some people are interested in using reddit for science communication, and some are just curious, but all of them wanted some basic information about how to use the site. So here’s my imperfect guide for folks who know nothing about reddit. (For starters, I just learned that... Read more

Science Communication and the Art of Not Stealing

Posted 14 March 2014 by Matt Shipman

I love art. In my free time, I enjoy visiting galleries and museums; in my professional life, I occasionally work with artists and designers on various communication projects. For these and other reasons, I know that art has value. And I’m not talking about some ethereal sense of moral, spiritual, or aesthetic value. I’m talking about dollars and cents. Art is, after all, a product. It is produced by the labor of artists. It is bought and sold – which... Read more

Why I Started Sciworthy.com

Posted 17 February 2014 by Matt Shipman

Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by Graham Short, a researcher at the California Academy of Sciences and founder of the science news site, Sciworthy. Sciworthy.com is a newly-launched science news platform for emerging and established scientists (grad students, post-docs, and Ph.Ds) to summarize their scientific research papers for a non-scientific or lay audience in order to share with family, friends, the general public, and even fellow scientists in other specialties. Each posting includes an engaging headline, the non-technical... Read more

Twitter, Analytics, and the Frustration of Silence

Posted 14 January 2014 by Matt Shipman

This (short) post is not explicitly about science communication. It's more about the lack of communication. But I'm hoping that maybe, finally, it will help me get some feedback from Twitter. (Note: this post has been updated. See bottom of story.) I write, and speak, fairly often on subjects related to communication metrics: how we measure the impact of our blogs, social media, etc. I'm currently working on two large(ish) projects that deal explicitly with social media metrics. So it... Read more

Why (and How) Nature and Reddit Science Are Teaming Up

Posted 11 December 2013 by Matt Shipman

On December 6, Reddit’s Science “Subreddit” announced a partnership with the venerable science news source Nature. Why did they team up? I wanted to know what Reddit, essentially an online bulletin board with an active community of users, would get out of partnering with Nature. I also wanted to know what Nature would get out of partnering with Reddit, which – though nicknamed “the front page of the internet” – has occasionally come under fire for the unsavory nature of... Read more