ABOUT Anne-Marie Hodge

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Anne-Marie Hodge is currently working on her doctoral degree at the University of Wyoming. She graduated from Auburn University in 2009 with a bachelor’s degree in Zoology, including a concentration in Conservation/Biodiversity and a minor in Anthropology. She completed a Master of Science in Biology at the University of North Carolina-Wilmington in 2012, and has participated in field research expeditions in the southwestern U.S., Mexico, Belize, Ecuador, and Kenya. When she is not chasing carnivores around the equator, Anne-Marie blogs at Endless Forms, and is a also frequent contributor to Ecology.com. You can see her writing and photos from the field at www.annemariehodge.com.

 

Anne-Marie Hodge: All Posts

 
 

The Enemy of My Enemy Means More Food–Monkeys Use Human Shields

Posted 29 July 2014 by Anne-Marie Hodge

The human species is a major driver of biodiversity loss across the globe. Occasionally, however, that propensity for extermination can become an advantage for animals that associate with us. What could be better protection from competing species than the presence of a menace that threatens wildlife? Sometimes, being the enemy of an enemy can turn us into a "friend"--or at least the lesser of two evils. This issue was highlighted in recent study involving the samango monkey (Cercopithecus mitis erythrarcus),... Read more

Does Sloth Fur Fungus Hold the Next “Wonder Drug?”

Posted 28 January 2014 by Anne-Marie Hodge

Throughout human history, humans have included wild animals in their folklore, mythology, and daily vocabulary. Animals with especially distinctive traits have likewise become ensconced in modern popular culture and language. Leonine features are considered striking and sexy, outfoxing someone is a demonstration of cleverness, and it is obnoxious to parrot someone in a conversation. Being slothful is unlikely to gain you any respect. Sloths spend the vast majority of their lives nearly sedentary, moving through the canopy at incremental paces.... Read more

Life in the slow lane: Primate metabolisms run at half the pace of other mammals

Posted 22 January 2014 by Anne-Marie Hodge

  Western society is obsessed with metabolism. Magazines bombard us with splashy headlines offering hyperbolic advice on how to boost, rev, fire up, jump-start, enhance, or otherwise maximize our metabolic rates. You should eat six meals a day, or fast two days a week, or drink green tea before every meal, or sleep 9 hours a night, or hang upside down, or use company X’s proprietary powder/capsule/plant-extract to ensure that your metabolism is purring along like a jet. We are... Read more

Parasite-Swapping Between Two Introduced Species: The Cane Toad Strikes Again

Posted 10 September 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

  Aliens are among us, and they don't have to come in the form of little green humanoids to cause problems. Non-native species create major headaches, whether they are introduced intentionally or arrive at far-flung places as stowaways. These "alien" invasive plants and animals can (and often do) wreak havoc on native species, because local organisms often lack the adaptations to deal with a novel predator and/or competitor to which they've never before been exposed. Entire ecosystems have been disrupted... Read more

“Casanovas are Liars” and the launch of a new open-access science journal

Posted 28 August 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

It is well known that higher quality items tend to be more desired, and often more expensive, than their lower quality counterparts. This applies to everything from tomatoes to cell phones to sexual partners. Social species face a quandary if the quantity of preferred items is limited, however, and competition is especially intense if members of that species commonly mimic each other's choices. For example, if you express a preference for something, you are indicating that you think it's relatively... Read more

Slimy Signals Save Salamanders

Posted 22 August 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

Everyone has experienced it: you hear a scream or shout of alarm coming from someone nearby, and instantly you feel your own blood pressure rise. Your metabolism revs up, you scan the area around you, and you might even physically jolt. All of this can happen before you've even observed the potential threat--you're reacting entirely to a cue from another person. We are tightly tuned to react to the alarm signals of others, because a threat to one member of... Read more

The Case of the Heterodox Fox: Bergmann’s Rule North and South of the Equator

Posted 11 August 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

Ecology is a mind-bogglingly complex field. As such, ecologists make few "rules"--they're more like "tentative tenets." Nature presents an exception for nearly everything, so even "rules" are often framed less as absolute laws and more as hypotheses to continue testing. One of the best-known "rules" of evolutionary ecology, is Bergmann’s rule, which predicts that endothermic animals found in cooler climates will have larger body sizes than conspecific populations or closely-related species in warmer habitats (Bergmann 1847). Bergmann’s reasoning was that... Read more

Hibernating Bears Run Hotter and Cleaner While Pregnant

Posted 3 August 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

When it comes to feats of physiology, bears are among the superstars of the mammalian world. Their endurance is legendary. During hibernation, bears regularly survive up to six full months without consuming any food at all. Hibernating bears reduce their heart rates by over 80% and decrease their metabolic rates by 50-75%, yet they actually remain conscious during this time (Laske et al. 2010; Tøien et al. 2011). Bears also manage to avoid muscle atrophy and loss of bone density,... Read more

‘Dead’beat Dads: First Evidence of Posthumous Reproduction

Posted 16 July 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

All organisms have an evolutionary imperative to maximize the number of offspring they produce. We work within a finite lifespan to successfully pass on as many genes as possible, however: so many gametes, so little time. Some strategy must be involved, right? Given the inescapable time constraints, many aspects of animal social structure are centered around producing as many healthy offspring as possible during a lifetime. From butterflies surviving only one month to elephants that live for sixty years, every... Read more

Fatal Attraction: Does Static Help Spiders Catch Prey?

Posted 8 July 2013 by Anne-Marie Hodge

It has probably happened to you: you pull a sweater over your head or take a load of freshly dried clothes out of the dryer, and all of the sudden you are a victim of static electricity. Your hair defies gravity, unwanted items cling to your clothes, your eyes feel dry, and you may even experience minute electrical shocks. This can be annoying and potentially awkward, to be sure . . . yet, as recent research conducted by scientists at... Read more