ABOUT Jalees Rehman

Avatar of Jalees Rehman

I love to read books. When I am not reading books, I work as a stem cell biologist and as a cardiologist. I am currently an Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmcology at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). I originally trained as a chronobiologist, investigating the circadian rhythms of bioluminescent algae at the University of Munich. After completing medical school in Munich, I moved from Germany to the United States. My research career meandered quite a bit, and involved cell adhesion molecules of leukocytes, the growth of blood vessels, cocaine-induced heart attacks, mitochondria in cancer cells, endocannabinoids, pulmonary hypertension and, finally, stem cells. I found nearly every aspect of biology quite exciting, and this is perhaps why I have chosen stem cell biology as my research focus. It allows me to combine and integrate so many aspects of biology. My laboratory currently studies the biology of embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as their therapeutic potential. My personal blog is entitled Fragments of Truth. I can be contacted at jalees.rehman[at]gmail.com.

 

Jalees Rehman: All Posts

 
 

Lab Grown Organs and Artistic Computers in Fifty Years?

Posted 17 April 2014 by Jalees Rehman

The Pew Research Center released the 2014 survey of U.S. adults (1,001 participants, surveyed by land-line or cell phone interviews) regarding their views on technological advancements in the next 50 years. Over eighty percent of the participants said that "People in need of an organ transplant will have new organs custom made for them in a lab" and roughly half of the participants felt that "Computers will be as effective as people at creating important works of art such as... Read more

New Study Shows Surgical Checklists In Operating Rooms Are Less Effective Than Assumed

Posted 16 April 2014 by Jalees Rehman

The patient has verified his or her identity, the surgical site, the type of procedure, and his or her consent. Check. The surgical site is marked on a patient if such marking is appropriate for the procedure. Check. The probe measuring blood oxygen content has been placed on the patient and is functioning. Check. All members of the surgical and anesthesia team are aware of whether the patient has a known allergy? Check. These were the first items on a... Read more

Infected with Love: A Viral Aphrodisiac in Crickets

Posted 27 March 2014 by Jalees Rehman

Like many other insects, field crickets (Gryllinae) use a courtship song to attract potential mates and initiate mating. A team of researchers headed by Shelley Adamo at Dalhousie University has recently discovered a surprising trigger which speeds up this dating process - a virus. In their recent article “A viral aphrodisiac in the cricket Gryllus texensis” published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, the researchers found that a pathogenic insect virus (iridovirus) is able to modify the sexual behavior of... Read more

New White House Budget: NIH funding will not be restored to pre-sequester levels

Posted 4 March 2014 by Jalees Rehman

The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) recommended that the White House increase the annual NIH budget to $32 billion dollars to help restore US biomedical research funding levels to those of 2003 (link):   The broad program of research supported by NIH is essential for advancing our understanding of basic biological functions, reducing human suffering, and protecting the country against new and re-emerging disease threats. Biomedical research is also a primary source of new innovations in health... Read more

The Largest Cell Therapy Trial in Heart Attack Patients Uses Hardly Any Stem Cells

Posted 28 February 2014 by Jalees Rehman

One of the world’s largest clinical cell therapy trials has begun to enroll 3,000 heart attack patients, some of whom will have bone marrow cells extracted with a needle from their hip and fed into their heart using a catheter in their coronary arteries. The BAMI trial has €5.9m in funding from the European Commission and will be conducted in ten European countries. Enlisted patients will be randomly assigned into two groups: one group will receive the standard care given... Read more

Neutrality, Balance and Anonymous Sources in Science Blogging – #scioStandards

Posted 24 February 2014 by Jalees Rehman

This is Part 2 of a series of blog posts in anticipation of the Upholding standards in scientific blogs (Session 10B, #scioStandards) session which I will be facilitating at noon on Saturday, March 1 at the upcoming ScienceOnline conference (February 27 – March 1, 2014 in Raleigh, NC - USA). Please read Part 1 here. The goal of these blog posts is to raise questions which readers can ponder and hopefully discuss during the session. 1.       Neutrality Neutrality is prized... Read more

Background Reading in Science Blogging – #scioStandards

Posted 21 February 2014 by Jalees Rehman

There will be so many interesting sessions at the upcoming ScienceOnline conference (February 27 – March 1, 2014 in Raleigh, NC - USA) that it is going to be difficult to choose which sessions to attend, because one will invariably miss out on concurrent sessions. If you are not too exhausted, please attend one of the last sessions of the conference: Upholding standards in scientific blogs (Session 10B, #scioStandards). I will be facilitating the discussion at this session, which will... Read more

Growing Skepticism about the Stem Cell Acid Trip

Posted 20 February 2014 by Jalees Rehman

In January 2014, the two papers “Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency” and “Bidirectional developmental potential in reprogrammed cells with acquired pluripotency” published in the journal Nature by Haruko Obokata and colleagues took the world of stem cell research by surprise. Since Shinya Yamanaka’s landmark discovery that adult skin cells could be reprogrammed into embryonic-like induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by introducing selected embryonic genes into adult cells, laboratories all over the world have been using modifications of... Read more

Is It Possible To Have Excess Weight And Still Be Healthy?

Posted 14 February 2014 by Jalees Rehman

Is it possible to be overweight or obese and still be considered healthy? Most physicians advise their patients who are overweight or obese to lose weight because excess weight is a known risk factor for severe chronic diseases such as diabetes, high blood pressure or cardiovascular disease. However, in recent years, a controversy has arisen regarding the actual impact of increased weight on an individual’s life expectancy or risk of suffering from heart attacks. Some researchers argue that being overweight... Read more