differentiation

 

The Road to Bad Science Is Paved with Obedience and Secrecy

Posted 8 July 2014 by Jalees Rehman

We often laud intellectual diversity of a scientific research group because we hope that the multitude of opinions can help point out flaws and improve the quality of research long before it is finalized and written up as a manuscript. The recent events surrounding the research in one of the world's most famous stem cell research laboratories at Harvard shows us the disastrous effects of suppressing diverse and dissenting opinions. The infamous "Orlic paper" was a landmark research article published in... Read more

Growing Skepticism about the Stem Cell Acid Trip

Posted 20 February 2014 by Jalees Rehman

In January 2014, the two papers “Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency” and “Bidirectional developmental potential in reprogrammed cells with acquired pluripotency” published in the journal Nature by Haruko Obokata and colleagues took the world of stem cell research by surprise. Since Shinya Yamanaka’s landmark discovery that adult skin cells could be reprogrammed into embryonic-like induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by introducing selected embryonic genes into adult cells, laboratories all over the world have been using modifications of... Read more

Replicability of High-Impact Papers in Stem Cell Research

Posted 23 July 2013 by Jalees Rehman

I recently used the Web of Science database to generate a list of the most highly cited papers in stem cell research. As of July 2013, the search for original research articles which use the key word "stem cells" resulted in the following list of the ten most widely cited papers to date:   1. Pittenger M et al. (1999) Multilineage potential of adult human mesenchymal stem cells. Science 284(5411):143-147 Citations: 8,157   2.  Thomson JA et al. (1998) Embryonic... Read more

Cellular Alchemy: Converting Fibroblasts Into Heart Cells

Posted 11 May 2013 by Jalees Rehman

Medieval alchemists devoted their lives to the pursuit of the infamous Philosopher's Stone, an elusive substance that was thought to convert base metals into valuable gold. Needless to say, nobody ever discovered the Philosopher’s Stone. Well, perhaps some alchemist did get lucky but was wise enough to keep the discovery secret. Instead of publishing the discovery and receiving the Nobel Prize for Alchemy, the lucky alchemist probably just walked around in junkyards, surreptitiously collected scraps of metal and brought them... Read more

To Branch, Or Not To Branch – Plant Hormones Help Turn A Stem Into A Bush

Posted 31 January 2013 by Jalees Rehman

When we hear the expression "stem cells", we tend to think of cells from animals or patients that are used to treat diseases or promote regeneration. However, stem cells are also present in plants. The growing tips of plants are called meristems and they are reservoirs of plant stem cells. A meristem is formed at the base of each leaf and can remain dormant as a small bud or be activated and give rise to a whole new branch. Gardeners... Read more

Using Viagra To Burn Fat

Posted 17 January 2013 by Jalees Rehman

Mammals have two types of fat tissue: Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT or "brown fat") and White Adipose Tissue (WAT or "white fat"). Brown fat cells are packed with many small fat droplets and mitochondria, which is why they appear "brown" under the microscope. Their mitochondria contain high levels of the protein UCP-1 (uncoupling protein 1), which "uncouples" fat metabolism from the generation of chemical energy molecules (ATP) for the cell. Instead, brown fat cells release the energy contained in the... Read more