Five Reasons To Love… Bacteria

23 February 2014 by Jack Scanlan, posted in Five Reasons To Love, Podcast

A cluster of E. coli, one of the most useful species of bacteria. Creative Commons-licensed photo via Flickr.

A cluster of E. coli, one of the most useful species of bacteria. Creative Commons-licensed photo via Flickr.

Here we are, my first short podcast for SciLogs, part of an ongoing series I'm calling Five Reasons To Love!

We all know science can be hard to get into sometimes - but it needn't be so if you focus on things that are interesting to everyone! As such, I'm taking the time to document the reasons (in audio form) why I love particular areas, topics or entities in science, from groups of organisms to scientific techniques, so I can share my enthusiasm for what other people might consider horribly dry or boring.

Don't get the appeal of something I love? Hopefully I'll change your mind by the end of the episode.

This first episode is on bacteria, an often neglected taxonomic category that's put down for its ties to human disease and discomfort. While I could have listed hundreds more examples for each of these points, I didn't want to drown you in details - that might have made the podcast a little counterproductive.

The music in Five Reasons To Love is "Something Elated", by Broke For Free.


2 Responses to “Five Reasons To Love… Bacteria”

  1. Stephen Reply | Permalink

    Love the podcast, it's really informative and interesting. Looking forward to hearing more!

Leave a Reply


three + 7 =