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What Happened With Cosmic Inflation?

The procedure was almost unprecedented, the excitement as well: on March 17 last year, astronomers around John Kovac from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics announced at a press conference that they had found the imprint of gravitational waves on the cosmic microwave background CMB, caused by the earliest moment after the Big Bang, the so-called cosmic inflation, in astronomical data from the South Pole. A scientific paper with these finding was presented at the same time, also with much ado,... Read more

 

Malaria increases risk of certain type of blood cancer?

Over 200 million people are infected with malaria, which kills over half a million – mostly children – each year. Malaria is caused by the Plasmodium parasite and is transmitted to humans from the bite of an infected mosquito. Inside the human, the parasite attaches to and invades the cells in the bloodstream. The cell both protects the parasite and provides food, allowing it to replicate into dozens of copies of itself. Once it has replicated and consumed the host... Read more

 

Birdbooker Report 387

SUMMARY: Books, books, beautiful books! This is a list of biology, ecology, environment, natural history and animal books that are (or will soon be) available to occupy your bookshelves and your thoughts. “Words in leather and wood”. Bookshelves in the “Long Room” at the old Trinity College Library in Dublin. Image: Nic McPhee from Morris, MN, USA. 2007. (Creative Commons.) Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky, My pile of books is a mile high. How I love them!... Read more

 

Morsels For The Mind – 21/08/2015

Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur &... Read more

 

The SCICOMM 25 (8.21.15)

Welcome to the SCICOMM 25! This is where I pull together the week's 25 most talked about science communication stories, determined by the engagement rate of stories I've shared on Twitter. Many are written by the world's leading science communicators. Some offer tips and advice, while others tackle important issues we need to discuss and debate. All of them are worth checking out. I hope you enjoy this week's list. Top Stories: A science conference restricts live tweeting and confusion ensues. ow.ly/R0F0c... Read more

 

Bohr & Heisenberg: Two Physicists in Occupied Copenhagen

Two men stroll through a park in Copenhagen in September 1941. Both are renowned physicists and Nobel Laureates, and they have also been close friends for many years. But now they find themselves on opposing sides: Werner Heisenberg is a leading scientist of Germany’s Uranium project, and Niels Bohr, his fatherly friend and mentor, is facing many difficulties in a Denmark that is occupied by German forces. Fifteen years earlier, both had formulated the basics of quantum mechanics together. On... Read more

 

The Danger of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Africa

Africa has the highest malaria burden in the world and 90% of all malaria deaths occur in Africa. The high death rate is due to Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest of the four malaria parasite species (Plasmodium falciparum, malariae, ovale, and vivax), which is already widespread on the continent.... Read more

 

Misadventures and Victories: An Unfiltered Look at Grad School in the Sciences

Grad students dishing about the 'misadventures and victories' of a life in the sciences. Oooh! Sign me up! Anyone who has gone to grad school knows there are plenty of mistakes to be made, and the victories...well, they're all hard won. The Bench Warmers Podcast digs deep, with revealing interviews exploring the intense emotional and mental pressure grad students experience each day. It's even been described as 'grad school therapy.' The Bench Warmers Podcast is produced by two University of Rochester students... Read more

 

Feminist Science: Debunking Period and Moodiness Myths

What is a period taboo? A culture of shame and discouragement around the topic of menstruation, reluctance to talk about or even acknowledge the fact that periods exist. So how does the period taboo affect women's health? When female-bodied people, from a very young age, are implicitly or explicitly taught by their culture that what their bodies naturally go through is disgusting, unacceptable, or shameful, their attitude about themselves and their confidence in their bodies decreases. It also discourages them... Read more

 

New Mini Lecture: Werner Heisenberg

For him, the smallest particles were the greatest – Werner Heisenberg, one of the founders of quantum mechanics. But who was this man – a genius and controversial figure – who decisively influenced the course of physics in the 20th century? This article is copyright © 2015 ... Read more

 

Dear Scientist: Your contribution to social media isn’t noise

Today, I sat in an all-day orientation program for new faculty at my university. I kept waiting for campus administrators to mention social media or other university-supported avenues for us to communicate our research more broadly than traditional academic mediums. But that discussion never came. I thought the orientation was a missed opportunity to talk to us about how important it is for academic scientists to communicate their science broadly. "So you would tell me I should be blogging, right?"... Read more

 

Birdbooker Report 386

SUMMARY: Books, books, beautiful books! This is a list of biology, ecology, environment, natural history and animal books that are (or will soon be) available to occupy your bookshelves and your thoughts. “Words in leather and wood”. Bookshelves in the “Long Room” at the old Trinity College Library in Dublin. Image: Nic McPhee from Morris, MN, USA. 2007. (Creative Commons.) Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky, My pile of books is a mile high. How I love them!... Read more

 

Morsels For The Mind – 14/08/2015

Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur &... Read more

 

The SCICOMM 25 (8.14.15)

Welcome to the SCICOMM 25! This is where I pull together the week's 25 most talked about science communication stories, determined by the engagement rate of stories I've shared on Twitter. Many are written by the world's leading science communicators. Some offer tips and advice, while others tackle important issues we need to discuss and debate. All of them are worth checking out. I hope you enjoy this week's list. Top Stories: A scientist's chat with her 8 year old daughter reveals... Read more

 

Hell Lab Ultrafast

The research team headed by Stefan Hell at the German Cancer Research Center has achieved another milestone in the field of high-resolution STED nanoscopy: The laser focus now moves 4,000 times faster than before. Stefan Hell during his lecture at the 65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, Copyright: LNLM Stefan Hell was awarded last year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy. The other two Laureates were the US scientists William E. Moerner and Eric Betzig. All... Read more