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Birdbooker Report 370

SUMMARY: Books, books, beautiful books! This is a list of biology, ecology, environment, natural history and animal books that are (or will soon be) available to occupy your bookshelves and your thoughts. “Words in leather and wood”. Bookshelves in the “Long Room” at the old Trinity College Library in Dublin. Image: Nic McPhee from Morris, MN, USA. 2007. (Creative Commons.) Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky, My pile of books is a mile high. How I love them!... Read more

 

#ResearchTrip2015 Part 2: Berkeley

Posted by Travis Park in Blogozoic

The second week of my US research trip has come and gone. This time I was in Berkeley, looking at specimens stored in the University of California Museum of Palaeontology (UCMP) collections. I managed to get lots more research done and met a few more palaeontologists, all of whom were working on some cool stuff of their own. My trip to Berkeley was made possible by me being awarded a grant from the Welles Research Fund. I’m very pleased to... Read more

 

Morsels For The Mind – 24/04/2015

Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur &... Read more

 

The SCICOMM 25 (4.24.15)

Welcome to the latest edition of the SCICOMM 25. This is where I pull together the week's 25 most talked about science communication stories, determined by the engagement rate of stories I've shared on Twitter. Many are written by the world's leading science communicators. Some offer tips and advice, while others tackle important issues we need to discuss and debate. All of them are worth checking out. I hope you enjoy this week's list. Top Stories: A science writing competition for non-professional (aspiring)... Read more

 

Seasonal Precipitation: Doubts about Droughts

This is the first in a series of guest blog posts by students who attended ComSciCon-Triangle. SciLogs is accepting story pitches that resulted from this science communication event from science graduate students! See more about the event here. Seasonal Precipitation: Doubts about Droughts, by Michael Angus Michael is a third year PhD Student at North Carolina State University, currently working on applying computer science techniques to climate change problems; specifically, rainfall variability in East Africa. Originally from the United Kingdom, he received his Bachelors... Read more

 

Citizen Science – What citizens contribute to research

The opportunities and limitations of an exciting concept. What is citizen science? Here’s one example of how it can work: sometimes the power of data-gathering technology means that a research team collects more data than it can actually analyse in the necessary timeframe. So the professional researchers bring in keen amateurs to help with the analysis, contributing via a specially designed web platform. Successful examples of this model include the project ‘Seafloor Explorer‘ that was undertaken by Woods Hole Oceanographic... Read more

 

New To Science Blogging #4 – Life et al.

  This post is the fourth in a recent guest blog series on my blog featuring science bloggers who recently got their start in the science blogosphere. This series of posts I'll be inviting from new science bloggers, or anyone who started blogging about science in the last year or so, will help paint a picture of how science bloggers get their start today. *If you want to contribute to this series, and you recently (within the last year or so) started any form of science... Read more

 

Newt Gingrich calls for doubling the NIH budget – but will that be enough?

Yesterday, past Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich called for a doubling of the NIH budget in an op-ed in The New York Times. He points out that funding for the NIH, which funds about a third of the medical research in the US, has remained flat since 2003. The result, he said, is that the institute awards about 12.5% fewer grants than in 2003, despite a 50% increase in grant applications. This is not new to anyone in science.... Read more

 

Journalism and Diversity: An Interview with Emma Carew Grovum

Journalism – including science journalism – has a long way to go in terms of increasing diversity. A 2013 article in Columbia Journalism Review reported that minorities make up less than 12.5 percent of newsroom staff – and only around 10 percent of newsroom supervisors. Earlier this year, I learned about the Journalism Diversity Project (JDP), which aims to boost newsroom diversity. To learn more about the project, I reached out to Emma Carew Grovum, one of the co-founders of... Read more

 

New To Science Blogging #3 – The Crinkle

This post is the third in a new guest blog series on my blog (fun!) featuring science bloggers who recently got their start in the science blogosphere. This series of posts I'll be inviting from new science bloggers, or anyone who started blogging about science in the last year or so, will help paint a picture of how science bloggers get their start today. *If you want to contribute to this series, and you recently (within the last year or so) started any form... Read more

 

Beatboxing birdsongs of New York

SUMMARY: In these fascinating videos, we see how one man’s quest to merge two passions -- bird watching and beatbox music – has created an experimental new form of music   I love beatboxing, but as an ornithologist and birder, I am absolutely delighted by this amazing experiment that a fellow New Yorker, Ben Mirin, is working on: he is using birdsong produced by birds that can be found in New York state as the inspiration for his beatboxing. Mr... Read more

 

Birdbooker Report 369

SUMMARY: Books, books, beautiful books! This is a list of biology, ecology, environment, natural history and animal books that are (or will soon be) available to occupy your bookshelves and your thoughts. “Words in leather and wood”. Bookshelves in the “Long Room” at the old Trinity College Library in Dublin. Image: Nic McPhee from Morris, MN, USA. 2007. (Creative Commons.) Books to the ceiling, Books to the sky, My pile of books is a mile high. How I love them!... Read more

 

Quantity, Quality, and Scope: an Interview with Siri Carpenter

MIT’s Knight Science Journalism program (KSJ) announced April 13 that it will be providing financial support to the non-profit website The Open Notebook (TON). KSJ will give TON $60,000 under a one-year pilot agreement to support the site’s mission of helping science journalists sharpen their skills. TON is a great resource for science reporters, and science writers generally, so I reached out to TON co-founder Siri Carpenter to learn more about the agreement and what KSJ’s support will enable TON... Read more

 

This week in science 100 years ago: an unexpected mystery

I thought, wouldn't it be interesting to see what major scientific discovery was printed in the The New York Times (NYT) 100 years ago? I could write up a quick post about it before the weekend. Little did I know that I would fall down a rabbit hole that threatened to offer no resolution.  100 years ago on April 18th, 1915, The NYT printed a two-page full spread article with the headline "TYPHUS, WAR'S DREAD ALLY, BEATEN; News of Dr. Harry Plotz's Vaccine Discovery... Read more

 

#ResearchTrip2015 Part 1: L.A.

Posted by Travis Park in Blogozoic

A week ago I set off from Melbourne on a 6 week research trip to 5 different cities in the U.S. I’m planning on writing a blog post at the end of my time in each city to give you all a little insight into what us scientists get up to when we embark on these adventures. Before I recap my past week in Los Angeles, the first stop on my journey, here’s some background as to what I’m actually planning... Read more