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Morsels For The Mind – 22/05/2015

Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur &... Read more

 

The SCICOMM 25 (5.22.2015)

Welcome to the SCICOMM 25! This is where I pull together the week's 25 most talked about science communication stories, determined by the engagement rate of stories I've shared on Twitter. Many are written by the world's leading science communicators. Some offer tips and advice, while others tackle important issues we need to discuss and debate. All of them are worth checking out. I hope you enjoy this week's list.   Top Stories: Blogging about your journal article isn't hard, and there's... Read more

 

Will saving the future of science help save humanity?

Posted by Louis Wang in Lindau Blog

Government investment in scientific research is not just an investment in the future of young scientists, but also that of mankind. The life of an early career scientist is not easy, and there are a lot of distractions and dangers along the road. As a clinician who has only recently re-entered the world of science during my doctoral studies, I frequently witness the amazing work and determination of the scientists at the research institute where I am studying. These researchers... Read more

 

Old News Won’t Help You, and More Tips on How to Pitch a Reporter

A few years ago, I wrote a long(ish) post on how to pitch story ideas to reporters without being annoying. A couple things have happened recently that make me want to add some new tips to the list. First, a reporter acquaintance of mine has been sharing some of the pitches she’s gotten lately which are particularly awful. And there are a lot of them. I won’t repeat the pitches, but I do want to highlight some of the mistakes... Read more

 

University Communication & Trust in Science: A Peek Behind the Curtain

Over the past few months, I have seen a number of articles and blog posts covering the issue of ‘hype’ in science reporting. Many of the stories point a finger at university press offices, obviously a result of this research paper. I haven’t been shy about sharing my thoughts on this issue. I continued the trend earlier this month when I participated in the "Trust in the Marketplace" panel during the “Does the Public Trust Science?” workshop, which took place May... Read more

 

Volcanoes in visual art

May 20 2015, 9pm in Alaska, tune in to KAKM Science Wednesdays, Alaska Public Media, for Frontier Scientists' COOK INLET VOLCANOES. Volcanologists and geologists explore volcanic activity along Cook Inlet from ancient history to modern-day, monitor volcanic activity to provide important warnings, and even take a look at volcanoes from space. The episode features USGS Alaska Volcano Observatory scientists. Catch clips online at http://frontierscientists.com/projects/cook-inlet-volcanoes/. Vulcan paint The natural destructive force of volcanoes and volcanic eruptions aren't easy to predict, monitor,... Read more

 

Physics against headaches

  Physics and headaches—I'm afraid for many people, who hear these two words, they think of them in one and only one combination, namely that physics causes a headache. Think about this. If I were to say that, for example, literature, Goethe and Shakespeare give me a headache, everyone would look at me as a complete philistine. While one usually gets away with saying that physics causes a headache. Physics is woven into what makes us human beings Let me elaborate... Read more

 

New to Science Blogging #10 – Scientist Sees Squirrel

This post is the tenth in an ongoing guest series on my blog featuring science bloggers who recently got their start in the science blogosphere. This series of posts I've been inviting from new science bloggers, or anyone who started blogging about science in the last year or so, is helping to paint a picture of how science bloggers get their start today. Cross-posted at FromTheLabBench.com -- Tenth up in the "New to Science Blogging" series is Stephen Heard. Stephen surprised me a few weeks ago by... Read more

 

Birth of the blue morphos

SUMMARY: Today’s “Museum Monday” features a visit to the Natural History Museum’s new Sensational Butterflies exhibition, where we watch a time-lapse video of their blue morpho butterflies emerging from chrysalises The Natural History Museum’s filmmakers recently captured a time-lapse video of the first of their blue morpho butterflies emerging from their chrysalises. These butterflies are now on view in their “Sensational Butterflies” exhibition. Several species of butterflies are commonly known as “blue morphos” so the specific (species) name often precedes... Read more

 

New to Science Blogging #9 – The Science Gumbo Blog

This post is the ninth in an ongoing guest series on my blog featuring science bloggers who recently got their start in the science blogosphere. This series of posts I've been inviting from new science bloggers, or anyone who started blogging about science in the last year or so, is helping to paint a picture of how science bloggers get their start today. Cross-posted at FromTheLabBench.com -- Ninth up in the "New to Science Blogging" series is Heather Soulen. Heather is a research technician at the Smithsonian Environmental... Read more

 

Morsels For The Mind – 15/05/2015

Every day we provide you with Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast to nibble away at. Here you can fill your brain with the most intellectually stimulating “amuse bouches” from the past week – a veritable smorgasbord for the cranium. They’re all here for you to load up your plate – this week’s “Morsels for the mind”. Enjoy! If you do nothing else, make sure to check out the “Reads / views / listens of the week”. **** Feather, fur &... Read more

 

The SCICOMM 25 (5.15.2015)

After a week off, the SCICOMM 25 is back! This is where I pull together the week's 25 most talked about science communication stories, determined by the engagement rate of stories I've shared on Twitter. Many are written by the world's leading science communicators. Some offer tips and advice, while others tackle important issues we need to discuss and debate. All of them are worth checking out. I hope you enjoy this week's list. Top Stories: A professor puts Gwyneth Paltrow’s health... Read more

 

The Ozone Hole Could Become History

The depletion of the ozone layer has been stopped, thanks to concerted international action. The 300 researchers who signed the latest report of the UN Environmental Programme UNEP even expect a recovery to the levels of 1980 by the year 2050. In the 1980s, the two ozone holes over the poles contributed to the general apocalyptic mood of that time, at least in some countries. In retrospect we might ask: Was everything only half as bad as it looked back... Read more

 

Cambridge Networks Network – CNDay 2015

At this year’s Cambridge Networks Day we were treated to a session on the challenges scientists have in carrying out research, and the pressures of writing papers, and making breakthrough discoveries by Professor Uri Alon. The session resonated with everybody. How we carry out research and create those conditions, which help us to generate new ideas, is a subject, which requires great sensitivity and study. Inspiration in how we tackle difficult research questions is not achieved through some rigid mechanical... Read more

 

Reflectance Confocal Microscopy: An Elegant, Revolutionary Technique with Boundless Possibilities

by guest blogger Joshua Davyd Fox, University of Miami, MD class of 2016   At the 2015 American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting, I serendipitously discovered Reflectance Confocal Microscopy (RCM). I sat mesmerized, watching the presenters quickly flip through black-and-white mosaic images of in vivo skin at microscopic resolution in what may best be described as a fusion between radiology and dermatology. As a fly in a room filled with experts of a drastically underutilized technology, I felt as though... Read more